First Aid Acronyms – SALTAPS

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When someone becomes injured, they may require assistance immediately. If certain injuries are left untreated, or the injured area is used or overused following injury then this could lead to slower healing, increase in pain or even infection.

A study conducted by the Royal Society of Medicine revealed that almost 50% of sport injury related trips to A&E involve children and adolescents. The most common sports that caused injury are football and rugby. Almost 25% of the injuries were fractured with the highest percentage being fractures to the upper limbs.

There are a number of studies that show that many members of the public do not feel confident in their ability to provide first aid, or would not know what to do in the event of an accident, injury or illness.

At TL Training, we are passionate about providing people with the highest level of first aid training so that they that they are able to confidently step forward and assist a casualty in any way they require. If you are interested in attending one of our first aid courses in Wirral call on 0151 343 0588.

What Is SALTAPS?

This acronym comes from the sporting aspect of first aid and is used to check if a player needs to be rested or removed from the field of play. The sooner an injury is treated, the higher the chance of complete recovery and the faster the rehabilitation.

SEE

See the injury occur and stop the play so you can assess the level of injury.

ASK

Ask the casualty what happened, how they feel, where do they have pain and what is the level of the pain?

LOOK

Look at the appearance of the injury site. Is there any bleeding, discoloration, bruising, swelling, bone or joint deformity or muscle spasm?

TOUCH

If the casualty will allow, touch the injured area. Can you feel any heat? How has the player reacted to the touch?

ACTIVE MOVEMENT

Are they able to move the injured area painlessly through a full range of movement?

PASSIVE MOVEMENT

If their active movement is ok, ask the player to relax their limb. You then need to try and move the limb yourself. Pain or tenderness at this point could suggest there is a ligament or tendon injury. The casualty should now seek medical advice.

STRENGTH

If the casualty has been through each step pain free, use resisted movements to assess loss of function. If the casualty has injured their leg, are they able to stand unassisted? Can they walk?

Get In Touch

Interested in undertaking one of our First Aid Courses in Wirral? Call us today on 0151 343 0588 to learn more. Alternatively, you can email us at sales@tltraining.co.uk and a member of our team will get back to you as soon as possible.

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